Menu

How difficult will it be to build this thing?

Home Forums OSSC OSSC – DIY Kit support How difficult will it be to build this thing?

This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Morpheus_79 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #17879

    lmtl809
    Participant

    Hi,

    After researching online the OSSC seems to me by far the best option for a quality retro gaming upscailer.

    I notice the assembled unit is now back in stock, but that you can also buy a DIY kit.
    Building it yourself is obviously a lot cheaper, however, I don’t really have much soldering experience and I’d have to buy a new soldering iron; aswell as sourcing parts that are not included in the two kits on the store.

    Clearly I do not have the knowledge or the equipment to do this, but maybe I could do?
    Could I learn this stuff with not years of experience, and considering I’d have to get a souldering iron would it even end up cheaper?

    Thanks a lot!

    #17887

    BonzoBits
    Participant

    It’s not necessarily difficult, but it can be expensive and will take time and effort. I found it was very rewarding though.

    If you do your research properly, and have decent solder skill, you’ll be fine. The main items you’ll need are:

    – temperature controlled soldering iron
    – x10 magnification (for checking for solder bridges on ICs)
    – x3 magnification lamp (for soldering the SMD ICs, resistors and capacitors)
    – solder wick (3mm is good)
    – 0.5mm soldiering wire

    Skills you should search for tutes on YT:

    – SMD fine pitch soldering
    – using solder wick (essential for SMD fine pitch soldering)

    Buying a decent temp controlled iron can mean you end up spending more than what you would for an assembled OSSC. But it is a lot of fun and you might just end up using the iron for other projects.

    My 2 cents worth – if you can spare the cash, you should it. You don’t need elite soldering skills, just a steady hand and the right equipment.

    #17892

    lmtl809
    Participant

    Thanks for the reply, that helped a lot.
    Do you have any brand recommendations for the equipment?

    Also, is it complex to read the schematics for the instructions?

    #17894

    Morpheus_79
    Participant

    Weller, JBC, Ersa and Hakko are generally good brands to choose your soldering station from. There are some Chinese Hakko clones out there for a budget price, which will do a pretty descent job too:

    … especially when equipped with an original Hakko soldering tip (which indeed fits on those clones).

    You don’t necessarily need the schematics to build your own OSSC. Essentially you just need the bill of materials (BOM):

    https://github.com/marqs85/ossc_pcb/tree/v1.6/bom

    There you can find the designators for every part, which are printed on the PCB itself too. That way you can see where every part belongs to. You just have to keep in mind, that the ICs have to be soldered with their marking showing in the right direction and that some parts (like diodes) have to be soldered with respect to the right polarity.

    #17898

    lmtl809
    Participant

    Thanks for the response, I’ll take a look at those brands. I have a Weller iron but it doesn’t take a fine tip as is needed. The one in the video looks very interesting.

    The parts list you linked: Is that absolutely everything you need, then? Does it include the bundle you can buy here on the site?

    #17905

    Morpheus_79
    Participant

    The list does include everything you need… except (of course) the pcb, the acrylic plates for the case, the power supply and the programmable remote. The advanced bundle kit contains:

    ● the Altera Cyclone 4 chip (EP4CE15E22C8N = on the BOM)
    ● the A/D video converter chip (TVP7002 = on the BOM)
    ● an aluminum heat sink for the TVP7002 (= on the BOM)
    ● the component video connector (= on the BOM)
    ● the IT6613E HDMI interface IC (= on the BOM)
    ● a right angle type SCART socket connector (= on the BOM)
    ● the pre-programmed firmware chip (S25FL216K = on the BOM… but – of course – it’s not pre-programmed with the OSSCs firmware, if you buy it from a wholesale supplier like Mouser)

    If you are buying the advanced kit, you need the simple DIY kit too, since the advanced kit does NOT include the pcb and the acrylic plates (and as mentioned: they are both not on the BOM).

    The simple kit contains ONLY the pcb and the acrylic plates. If you are planning on just buying that (and since only the advanced kit contains a pre-programmed firmware chip) for the simple DIY kit you also need some equipment to write the firmware onto the flash memory chip… as i described here:

    OSSC Firmware flash for the S25FL116K0XMFI041

    A cheap USB Blaster clone (for around 3-5 bucks) and an older version of the Quartus Prime software (i did use v13.1.0.162) will do the job just fine.

    No matter if you are buying the simple or the simple AND the advanced DIY kit: you have to buy a stabilized 5V power supply too (with a 2.1 mm barrel jack and with at least 1A output), if you do not have any.

    Since neither of those kits include a remote control, you may need to buy one too. The remote is kind of a tricky part. You can buy a ChungHop L336 learning remote (as delivered with the pre-build OSSC) – but it has to be mentioned: the L336 needs a compatible remote to learn from. BUT if you already have such a compatible remote (that is recognized by the OSSC), you don’t necessarily need the L336 in the first place. So it is kind of a weird loop. But at least chances are pretty good, that you (or someone you know) owns a compatible remote control to make the L336 learn from…

    #17931

    lmtl809
    Participant

    Thanks for the detailed reply.
    So rather than searching for the parts on the first list you linked, could I just buy the simple DIY kit, advanced DIY kit, power supply and remote? Would that be everything?

    Also, is the remote control an actual requirement or just something recommended? I was unsure as to whether I could control the device on the hardware its self.

    EDIT: Do you think this soldering iron would be okay? It’s the same brand as the one in the video but not the same model: https://www.amazon.co.uk/YiHua-Soldering-Station-Welder-Repairing/dp/B074Z84TDL/ref=sr_1_3/257-9277959-4901744?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1512938907&sr=1-3&keywords=yihua

    I couldn’t find the model in the video here in the UK.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  lmtl809.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  lmtl809.
    #17937

    Morpheus_79
    Participant

    So rather than searching for the parts on the first list you linked, could I just buy the simple DIY kit, advanced DIY kit, power supply and remote? Would that be everything?

    No… not even close. You still need to buy the capacitors, resistors, fuses, voltage regulators, oscillators, connectors, buttons, diodes, the display, the IR receiver and some more parts.

    If you open the BOM Excel file (you can use Microsofts free Excel Viewer or Open Office Calc): everything marked red is part of the advanced kit… everything else you still have to buy from a supplier of your choice.

    Also, is the remote control an actual requirement or just something recommended? I was unsure as to whether I could control the device on the hardware its self.

    The OSSC only has two buttons and the controllability of the OSSC with those two is very limited:

    http://junkerhq.net/xrgb/index.php?title=OSSC#PCB_buttons

    As you can see: without the remote you can only chose the input connector and the scanline mode… but not much more. So if you want to configure or even fine tune the input and output settings, you HAVE to have a remote.

    Do you think this soldering iron would be okay? It’s the same brand as the one in the video but not the same model

    Don’t look for the brand name. Chinese sellers sell the same soldering station worldwide under 5, maybe 6 (or even more) different brand names – like Atten 936, YaXun 936, Aoyue 936, Uluo 936, LionKing 936, Quick 936, and so on, and so on… even WITHOUT any brand name at all:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Electronic-Soldering-Station-Degrees-Temperature/dp/B00JRD08P8/

    Since it’s a clone of the pretty descent classic Hakko 936 soldering station, they always keep the ‘936’ while changing the brand. You should definitely buy an additional genuine Hakko 936 tip, since the chinese soldering tips are usually pretty crappy and wont last very long.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Morpheus_79.
Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.